[Time Management #2] Time Logging: Log Where Your Time Actually Goes


Preamble

This article is the second in a series of four articles that presents the basics of diagnosing how you tend to spend your time and how you can develop the discipline of spending your time on what really matters to you. Yesterday’s article established that effective time management is truly not about managing time as such; rather, it is about managing priorities. See full article here.

Time Logging where time actually goes for 'Time Management'

Log How You Spend Your Time

“Effective executives, in my observation, do not start with their tasks. They start with their time. And they do not start out with planning. They start by finding out where their time actually goes.”
-Peter Drucker in ‘The Effective Executive’

Before you begin managing your time effectively, you need to develop an idea of how you spend time currently.

Below is a simple exercise to help you track how you use your hours and minutes during a suitably long period of time, ideally a whole week. If you follow a specific routine everyday, you may be able to approximate your time analysis by doing this exercise for a couple of weekdays and a Saturday or a Sunday. Alternatively, you may choose to do this only during your time at work. Again, more data leads to a more comprehensive analysis; hence, try to log an entire week.

Log where time actually goes -- Time Log Template

  1. Create a simple chart that consists of four columns as in the above illustration. Column 1 contains labels for time intervals, in 10- or 15-minute increments. Column 2 records your activity. Column 3 identifies the project or purpose that activity served. Column 4 rates the effectiveness of time spent. Itemizing all these details is the key to identifying time wasted and time effectively used.
  2. Make as many photocopies of this chart as required for a whole week.
  3. Carry your time log charts around with you wherever you go. Record every activity — significant or insignificant, large or small — during the entire week. Include time spent at your morning ablutions, travel time, time spent chitchatting around the water cooler, time spent helping your daughter with homework, telephone time, time spent on the internet — your sleeping time too.

Time Log Forms

Here are two PDF forms you could download and use:

You need not necessarily stop every 10th or 15th minute to record your activity. You can fill up the relevant rows once every hour or so. If you spend two hours on an airplane, you can mark 12 rows (of 10 minutes each) with a single comment. You need not be very precise: if you spend 7 minutes on the phone with a customer, you can record spending an entire 10 minutes.

Here is what your log should look like.

Log where time actually goes -- Time Log Example

Benefits of Time Logging

The immediate benefit of time logging is that it induces a sense of significance of your time. It compels you into the right mindset to consider habits you need to develop, avoid or change and start using your hours and minutes more effectively.

The more significant advantage is that your time logs will serve as a foundation for structuring your time according to your priorities and thus enable effective time management.

Tomorrow’s article will focus on time-analysis to help you review results from your time logs and prepare you for budgeting time according to your priorities.

***See other articles related to time management, managing priorities, effectiveness, personal organization, getting things done, execution, time logging, time survey, work-life balance

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5 Responses to [Time Management #2] Time Logging: Log Where Your Time Actually Goes

  1. Calcatraz says:

    Time logging is something I do every 3-6 months and always find some surprises in the results. I find the biggest benefit is in identifying the one area in which I have the biggest time drain. I then generally focus on improving that area until the next time logging session. Currently I’m overdue for a time logging session. I generally run them for one week and as tomorrow is Monday I’m going to kick it off then. And I might just give your forms a go!

  2. Melanie Titus says:

    I just started using your forms and I find it to be very useful, Time logging for me is a process I’d rather do without, but your forms have made this task somewhat easier. Thank you so much :D

  3. kiara says:

    thank you very much !!

  4. Rami says:

    Thank you very much :-) that PDF form has just saved my life!

  5. Michelle says:

    Thank you for the PDF this forms are very helpfull

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